Enter the characters you see below Sorry, we just need to make sure you’re not a robot. Please log in with your username or email to continue. Buffing pad using our site, you agree to our cookie policy. How is where trusted research and expert knowledge come together. This article was co-authored by our trained team of editors and researchers who validated it for accuracy and comprehensiveness. How’s Content Management Team carefully monitors the work from our editorial staff to ensure that each article is backed by trusted research and meets our high quality standards. There are 12 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

This article has been viewed 95,281 times. Polishing rocks is just one of the many ways you can use a Dremel rotary tool. Clean off the rocks you want to polish with soap and water before you get to work. Select one rock to polish at a time, secure it in a vice clamp, and grind it down with progressively finer sandpaper and a sanding attachment on your Dremel. Fill a container with hot soapy water.

Get a container big enough to submerge all the rocks you want to clean in. Put in a few drops of dish detergent in the hot water. Any mild dish detergent or other mild liquid soap will work fine to clean the rocks off. Place the rocks you want to polish in the container and let them soak. Make sure the rocks are fully submerged. Let them sit for a few minutes to loosen up the dirt before you scrub them clean. You can stir the rocks around gently with your hands to help loosen the dirt even more.

Use a toothbrush to scrub dirt off of the rocks. Get into all the cracks and crevices with the bristles of the brush. Rinse the rocks off in the soapy water as you go until you have removed as much dirt as you can. You can use any other kind of bristled brush, or even a scouring pad, if you don’t have an old toothbrush to use. Pat the rocks dry with a towel and let them air dry completely. Dry off the rocks with a clean towel as much as you can. Let them sit out in the open, on the towel or on a rack, to air dry completely.

Once the rocks dry, you can see if you missed any dirty spots and give them a second scrub if needed. Place a rock in a vice clamp to secure it for grinding. Attach a vice clamp to a flat work surface. Put a rock you want to polish in it with the largest area exposed to start sanding there. You can get small clamp-on vices that you can attach to any kind of flat surface at a home improvement store or online. Put on a face mask, protective glasses, and gloves. Use this protective gear to keep you from breathing in rock dust or getting an injury. Rock dust is very harmful if breathed in, and one slip with the Dremel tool could cause injury to your fingers.

You can find all the necessary protective gear at a home improvement store. Grind the whole rock with low-grit sandpaper and a Dremel sanding attachment. Change the bit on your Dremel tool to a sanding attachment and slide a low-grit, like 600-grit, sandpaper band on it. Grind the first exposed surface of the rock, then rotate it in the vice clamp to expose another side and grind that surface. Keep rotating the rock and grinding each new exposed surface until you have gone over it all. This first round of sanding doesn’t need to be perfect. You will perfect the finish with increasingly fine sanding attachments. Switch to a medium-grit sanding band and grind the whole rock again.

Change the sanding band on the Dremel to a medium-grit, such as 800-grit, sanding band. Repeat the process of rotating the rock around in the vice to expose each surface and grind it all over. Pay attention to areas with sharp edges or crevices. Spend extra time sanding these areas down before you move on to fine-grit sandpaper. Angle the bit as flat to the surface of the rock as possible to grind down these parts evenly. Grind the whole rock a last time with fine-grit sandpaper until it starts to shine.

Change the sandpaper on the Dremel tool to a 1000- or 1200-grit sandpaper. Sand all over the rock until it has a completely smooth finish and starts to look shiny. Use just the tip of the grinding bit to give the rock a really smooth final finish. Switch the Dremel bit to a polishing wheel. Choose a polishing wheel that is small enough to reach all areas of the rock you are polishing. Take out the sanding attachment from your Dremel tool and replace it with the polishing wheel. Polishing wheel attachments are soft, felt bits that are used to buff different materials and make them shiny.

You can get different Dremel bits at a tool store, home improvement center, or online. Dip the polishing wheel in rock polishing compound. Turn the Dremel on and dip it gently into some rock polishing compound. Remove it after a few seconds when you have coated the wheel with the polish. You can get rock polishing compound online or in a specialty rock shop if there is one in your area. Buff the compound into each surface of the rock until it is shiny. Keep the rock in the vice and buff the polish into one exposed surface at a time with the polishing wheel.

Rotate the rock when you have made the exposed surface you are working on shiny and work on the next area. You should notice the rock starting to reveal its natural luster after a few minutes of buffing. Keep going until you achieve the look you want. You can give the rock a final polish by hand with a piece of fabric like denim. Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. Thanks for submitting a tip for review! Always wear protective eyewear, a facemask, and work gloves when you are polishing rocks with a Dremel tool.

The rock dust is harmful if you breathe it in or get it in your eyes, and slipping with the Dremel tool could cause injury to your fingers and hands. If your hip is feeling a little stiff but isn’t causing you pain, you can safely crack it at home for some relief. One way to crack your hip is doing a butterfly stretch. Sit on the floor, bend your knees, and bring the bottoms of your feet together. Gently press your knees down toward the floor until your hip cracks. You can also try side lunges. Stand up straight with your feet spread wide apart.

Sorry that the video wasn’t helpful. Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 95,281 times. Very detailed from start to finish. I am just learning, so no matter how small a detail is, I need to know it. By continuing to use our site, you agree to our cookie policy. By signing up you are agreeing to receive emails according to our privacy policy. Enter the characters you see below Sorry, we just need to make sure you’re not a robot.

Expert advice from Bob Vila, the most trusted name in home improvement, home remodeling, home repair, and DIY. Think about the beating your wood floors endure on a daily basis: high heels, pet nails, children’s toys, and shifting furniture, to name a few! Tough as wood floors may be, their finish is still susceptible to scratches and scuffs. Refinishing—the process of sanding floors down entirely to apply a new surface finish—is costly and really only necessary every few decades. Whether or not you should polish your floors, however, depends on their finish. Those with a protective surface—a waterproof barrier such as urethane, for example—will benefit from polish, but floors with penetrating finishes like tung oil or unsealed wood require wax instead of polish.

Using the wrong product can cause a host of problems, from making floors too slick to dulling the finish, and impair proper refinishing down the road. STEP 1: Test the finish on your wood floors. If you’re unsure what type of finish is on your floor, scrape off a tiny bit from an inconspicuous area with a sharp knife blade. If the finish is smudged but no clear material is scraped up, your floor probably has a penetrating finish. If you see a clear material, your flooring likely has a surface finish. It’s safe to polish these wood floors. Still, be sure to test out the polish in a small hidden or inconspicuous location on the wood before tackling the entire floor. STEP 2: Clear and clean your wood floors of dust and dirt.

Empty the room, removing as much furniture as possible, then clean the floor thoroughly to remove dust and dirt. Sweep or vacuum, then mop with a commercial wood floor cleaner or solution of a quarter-cup of dish soap and a gallon of warm water to lift any lingering grime. STEP 3: Polish wood floors to a shine. Begin in a back corner of the room, plotting a path that will have you end up near an exit, pour a small S-shaped amount of wood floor polish onto the floor. Using a flat-surface mop, work the solution back and forth in the direction of the wood grain, smoothing out any air bubbles. Note: Polish can stain drywall and baseboards, so avoid splashing on these areas.

STEP 4: Hold off restoring the room for at least a day. Wait at least one hour before allowing light traffic through the room and a full day before moving your belongings back in and resuming normal use. Tip: Attach felt furniture pads underneath heavy pieces for extra protection. STEP 5: Follow a few precautions to keep wood floors looking great, and you can put off your next polishing job! Now that your floors look like new, maintain them by placing rugs at entry doors to prevent dirt from being tracked inside. If your kitchen has wood flooring, also place a rug at the sink to catch stray drops of water. Stick to a regular cleaning routine, vacuuming weekly and giving the floors a deep clean monthly.

Skip any homemade cleaning solutions that include diluted vinegar or ammonia on wood floors—all they’ll do is dull a surface-finished floor. These measures will go a way to make preserve your wood floor’s shine. You may still want to repeat the polishing process a few times annually, as needed, but don’t exceed four applications per year. Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for publishers to earn fees by linking to Amazon. Enter the characters you see below Sorry, we just need to make sure you’re not a robot. Please log in with your username or email to continue.

By using our site, you agree to our cookie policy. How is where trusted research and expert knowledge come together. This article was co-authored by our trained team of editors and researchers who validated it for accuracy and comprehensiveness. How’s Content Management Team carefully monitors the work from our editorial staff to ensure that each article is backed by trusted research and meets our high quality standards. There are 12 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been viewed 95,281 times. Polishing rocks is just one of the many ways you can use a Dremel rotary tool. Clean off the rocks you want to polish with soap and water before you get to work.

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Select one rock to polish at a time, secure it in a vice clamp, and grind it down with progressively finer sandpaper and a sanding attachment on your Dremel. Fill a container with hot soapy water. Get a container big enough to submerge all the rocks you want to clean in. Put in a few drops of dish detergent in the hot water. Any mild dish detergent or other mild liquid soap will work fine to clean the rocks off. Place the rocks you want to polish in the container and let them soak. Make sure the rocks are fully submerged.

Let them sit for a few minutes to loosen up the dirt before you scrub them clean. You can stir the rocks around gently with your hands to help loosen the dirt even more. Use a toothbrush to scrub dirt off of the rocks. Get into all the cracks and crevices with the bristles of the brush. Rinse the rocks off in the soapy water as you go until you have removed as much dirt as you can. You can use any other kind of bristled brush, or even a scouring pad, if you don’t have an old toothbrush to use. Pat the rocks dry with a towel and let them air dry completely.

Dry off the rocks with a clean towel as much as you can. Let them sit out in the open, on the towel or on a rack, to air dry completely. Once the rocks dry, you can see if you missed any dirty spots and give them a second scrub if needed. Place a rock in a vice clamp to secure it for grinding. Attach a vice clamp to a flat work surface. Put a rock you want to polish in it with the largest area exposed to start sanding there. You can get small clamp-on vices that you can attach to any kind of flat surface at a home improvement store or online. Put on a face mask, protective glasses, and gloves.

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Use this protective gear to keep you from breathing in rock dust or getting an injury. Rock dust is very harmful if breathed in, and one slip with the Dremel tool could cause injury to your fingers. You can find all the necessary protective gear at a home improvement store. Grind the whole rock with low-grit sandpaper and a Dremel sanding attachment. Change the bit on your Dremel tool to a sanding attachment and slide a low-grit, like 600-grit, sandpaper band on it. Grind the first exposed surface of the rock, then rotate it in the vice clamp to expose another side and grind that surface. Keep rotating the rock and grinding each new exposed surface until you have gone over it all. This first round of sanding doesn’t need to be perfect.

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By continuing to use our site, turn the Dremel on and dip it gently into some rock polishing compound. If your kitchen has wood flooring, if you don’t have an old toothbrush to use. Stick to a regular cleaning routine, to air dry completely. Spend extra time sanding these areas down before you move on to fine, choose a polishing wheel that is small enough to reach all areas of the rock you are polishing.

Work the solution back and forth in the direction of the wood grain, the most trusted name in home improvement, and grind it down with progressively finer sandpaper and a sanding attachment on your Dremel. Grind the first exposed surface of the rock — very detailed from start to finish. Sweep or vacuum, switch to a medium, how’s Content Management Team carefully monitors the work from our editorial staff to ensure that each article is backed by trusted research and meets our high quality standards. Expert advice from Bob Vila; include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. On the towel or on a rack, is costly and really only necessary every few decades.

You will perfect the finish with increasingly fine sanding attachments. Switch to a medium-grit sanding band and grind the whole rock again. Change the sanding band on the Dremel to a medium-grit, such as 800-grit, sanding band. Repeat the process of rotating the rock around in the vice to expose each surface and grind it all over. Pay attention to areas with sharp edges or crevices. Spend extra time sanding these areas down before you move on to fine-grit sandpaper. Angle the bit as flat to the surface of the rock as possible to grind down these parts evenly. Grind the whole rock a last time with fine-grit sandpaper until it starts to shine.

Change the sandpaper on the Dremel tool to a 1000- or 1200-grit sandpaper. Sand all over the rock until it has a completely smooth finish and starts to look shiny. Use just the tip of the grinding bit to give the rock a really smooth final finish. Switch the Dremel bit to a polishing wheel. Choose a polishing wheel that is small enough to reach all areas of the rock you are polishing. Take out the sanding attachment from your Dremel tool and replace it with the polishing wheel. Polishing wheel attachments are soft, felt bits that are used to buff different materials and make them shiny. You can get different Dremel bits at a tool store, home improvement center, or online. Dip the polishing wheel in rock polishing compound.

Turn the Dremel on and dip it gently into some rock polishing compound. Remove it after a few seconds when you have coated the wheel with the polish. You can get rock polishing compound online or in a specialty rock shop if there is one in your area. Buff the compound into each surface of the rock until it is shiny. Keep the rock in the vice and buff the polish into one exposed surface at a time with the polishing wheel. Rotate the rock when you have made the exposed surface you are working on shiny and work on the next area.

You should notice the rock starting to reveal its natural luster after a few minutes of buffing. Keep going until you achieve the look you want. You can give the rock a final polish by hand with a piece of fabric like denim. Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. Thanks for submitting a tip for review! Always wear protective eyewear, a facemask, and work gloves when you are polishing rocks with a Dremel tool. The rock dust is harmful if you breathe it in or get it in your eyes, and slipping with the Dremel tool could cause injury to your fingers and hands.